Word of the Day: glaucous

Grey Eyes
Source: PEI Magazine

Word of the Day: glaucous

glaucous (adjective) GLAW-kus

Definition

1 a : of a pale yellow-green color

   b : of a light bluish-gray or bluish-white color

2 : having a powdery or waxy coating that gives a frosted appearance and tends to rub off

Faery Realm
Source: FaeryRealm

Examples

“Her eyes, a clear, glaucous gray, express unambiguous yearning.” — Amanda Petrusich, The New Yorker, 26 May 2016

“Waxy, hard, hairy and glaucous leaves help prevent water loss.” — Patrice Hanlon,The Mercury News (California), 10 Aug. 2016

Did You Know?

Glaucous came to English—by way of Latin glaucus—from Greek glaukos, meaning “gleaming” or “gray,” and has been used to describe a range of pale colors from a yellow-green to a bluish-gray. The word is often found in horticultural writing describing the pale color of the leaves of various plants as well as the powdery bloom that can be found on some fruits and leaves. The stem glauc- appears in some other English words, the most familiar of which is glaucoma, referring to a disease of the eye that can result in gradual loss of vision. Glauc- also appears in the not-so-familiar glaucope, a word used to describe someone with fair hair and blue eyes (and a companion to cyanope, the term for someone with fair hair and brown eyes).

Imagenes y Carteles - Sirenas
Source: Imagenes y Carteles

My Take

I doubt I will use this word much. In my research, I found that in current times, glaucous mostly refers to makeup colors, especially eye makeup. Stretching further, I found other images but rarely associated with the word. I did find one synonym for it, opaque, which M-W did not list. Theauraus.com failed to have it in its database. In my experience, this is not unusual, but enlightening.

Please share your comments. I’m sure we would all enjoy reading them.

By the way, if you share this post by clicking one of the twitter buttons, you will be treated with a sexier image related to the word. My gift to you.

mw_logoBrought to you by Merrian-Webster, Word of the Day.

Subscribe to Blog via Email

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.