Missing Persons, Human Trafficking

Reviews

I recently received a review of my book, ‘The Trafficking Consortium’ a story about missing persons and human trafficking. As much as I love five-star reviews, this reviewer gave a single one, and I love it.

The Trafficking ConsortiumSo far, readers are either on one side of the fence or the other. To date, there have been zero mediocre reviews. They don’t comment on the writing, the grammar, or other such vital issues regarding a book. They all write about the story, either it’s terrific, or they’re too horrified, denying to themselves to think it might be genuine. I find that awesome. People are reacting to my story. Nice!

The latest review states:

“I don’t think this crazy sadistic world needs someone giving them horrific ideas to make people even worse.”

And the one that especially makes me smile is:

“Hope and pray this is truly fiction since it made me sick to THINK that a human could treat another human this way. “

Missing Persons

I have to tell you. I was concerned writing this novel, but probably not for the reasons you may suspect. The very concept of the story may seem so far out there that it couldn’t possibly be real. While it is a pure work of fiction, I hope and pray that the agency I write about, ‘The Consortium,’ does not exist. Yet, I fear that I am wrong. I honestly believe that they might be real.

Look at the evidence. Each year, thousands of missing persons disappear, forever. No trace of them is ever found. No evidence indicates what might have happened to them. And this is just in America. Similar numbers per capita exist in every developed country on the planet. Horrifically, most of the missing are children. Since I won’t write stories involving children, I will keep my numbers to adults.

Adult Missing Persons by race

According to CBS researcher, Tanita Gaither, published May 9, 2013, in Atlanta Updated, “Of the 900,000 reported missing persons each year in the U.S., 50,000 are over the age of 18.” The chart breaks down the missing by race. It seems to me that none of us is immune.

Fifty thousand adults in America, gone. Nearly all are never found. The rate of missing person incidence is growing, from 150,000 in 1980 to over 900,000 each year. Those figures are just those in the U.S. They do not include those reported missing overseas. I can say with certainty, that thousands more go missing and unreported to authorities. I can’t even fathom the 850,000 being children under the age of 18. I’m appalled.

In 2008, 481 British adults disappeared while abroad, and 401 in 2007 and 336 in 2006. (Carole Moore, ‘The Last Place You’d Look,’ [Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. 2011.]

Where are they now?

Missing Person, Adult FemaleIn researching this article, I wanted to find an appropriate image or two to use supporting the evidence. I was astounded and perturbed to see the sheer volume of pictures of missing people, from all sects of life, race, gender, nationality, what have you. Google images using the tag ‘missing persons’ and you will discover yourself just how fucked our species is. God help us from ourselves.

What happened to them? Are they choosing to disappear? Do they not want to be found? If not, who is culling them from their homes? Were they kidnapped, stolen off the streets? Where are they? Are they dead? If so, where are their bodies? If they are still alive, where did they go? Are they, in fact, slaves for someone’s amusement? Are they bound servants, performing to fatten their owner’s wallet?

A Ring of Truth

While writing my story, I started looking over my shoulder, wondering whether I was being watched and followed. I can’t tell you how many times I debated with myself whether to finish the story and then again, to publish it. I may not fit their profile of acceptable prey, but I do believe that if I get too close to the truth, they may want to remove me as a threat.

You may think that I am crazy, but I cannot control my feelings. They just happen, and I would be a fool to ignore them. I’ll be honest with you. I am scared, and you should be too.

It’s true, I fear that my story may have more than a ring of truth to it. I wrote the story with the idea that the Consortium only culls a few hundred people a year, out of the billions who live on the planet. Could I be understating the number? I hope I am wrong.

I’m not saying that an organization like the Consortium is out there, snatching people for personal gain and satisfaction. I just raise the possibility that there may be such a global outfit.

Follow-up

And still, based upon the feedback I’ve received, I’m writing a sequel, with the idea of turning Avril’s story into a trilogy. She is one such missing person, a slave to someone’s amusement, and is the main character and victim of the book. It is unlikely that she was ever reported missing. The Consortium is very good at covering their tracks. I told her story from her point of view, and at the end, she seemed to accept her new station in life. But did she?

Did she really accept a life as own property, to do someone’s bidding or suffer the consequences? Can she accept her new life as someone’s slave? Can she willing suffer anguish and even learn to do the same to others? Will she learn to torture and kill another human being? Her owner seems to think so, but will she really?

I can’t wait to finish writing her new story.

If you read the first book, you’ll understand why I’m calling the sequel, ‘Perfect Prey.’

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: