Word of the Day: hoke

Madonna spanking Amy Schumer on stage

Word of the Day: hoke

Madonna spanking Amy Schumer on stage
Source: thecelebrityauction.co

Hoke (verb) HOHK

Definition

: to give a contrived, falsely impressive, or hokey quality to — usually used with up

Examples

“Its okay that everybody looks great, though certain scenes seem hoked up. A black cat crossing the path of a motorcade about to explode feels more like Hollywood moviemaking than truth telling….” — D.J. Palladino, The Santa Barbara Independent, 10 Jan. 2013

“‘Concussion’ has the sober, patient earnestness of a lawyer preparing a major case—it’s a dramatization of true events and occasionally hoked up in the finest Hollywood tradition, but it wants to stir you into being convinced instead of the other way around.” — Ty Burr, The Boston Globe, 25 Dec. 2015

Charlotte Moorman and her fabulous 'cello'
Source: unknown

Did You Know?

Hoke is a back-formation of hokum, which was probably created as a blend of hocus-pocus and bunkum. Hokum is a word for the theatrical devices used to evoke a desired audience response. The verb hoke appeared in the early 20th century and was originally used (as it still can be today) when actors performed in an exaggerated or overly sentimental way. Today, it is often used adjectivally in the form hoked-up, as in “hoked-up dialogue.” The related word hokey was coined soon after hoke to describe things that are corny or phony.

My Take

Heather Marie Hoke headshot
Source: starnostar.com

Well, this is a first. I could not find an appropriate image that represented the definition of the word ‘hoke.’ Oh, sure, I found lots of images connected to the term, but nothing related to its definition.

Numerous people are named ‘hoke’ including Playboy model Heather Marie Hoke and a host of other people. (BTW, if you share this post via Twitter, you’ll be treated to a nude photo of her.) I found various buildings named ‘hoke,’ product after product and even many state counties all around the U.S. But nothing specifically related to the meaning of the word.

So, I had to expand my search, using words related to the term. I came up with a number of stage performances are either contrived or outrageous. So, I included one of Madonna spanking Amy Schumer on stage. If you haven’t had a chance to see either of these women in person or attended one of their live performances, I urge you to do so. I’ve them both live and on stage, and I had a great time each time I’ve seen them.

Lovable The Hoke House Chris Ocean Photography Portland
Source: opteks.site

Merriam-Webster

I love learning the different contexts of these words of the day. Don’t you? Please share your comments. I’m sure we would all like to read them.

A sexy bonus picture is available by sharing this post on Twitter. My gift to you for sharing.

Brought to you by Merriam-Webster, Word of the Day.

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Word of the Day: frieze

Frieze
Frieze
Source: drxelaandarchitecture.wordpress.com

Word of the Day: frieze

frieze (noun) FREEZ

Definition

1 : the part of an entablature between the architrave and the cornice

2 : a sculptured or richly ornamented band (as on a building or piece of furniture)

3 : a band, line, or series suggesting a frieze

Examples

“The house commands a hilltop and is forbidding, imposing, but softened with a frieze of beautiful American elms.” — Lady Bird Johnson, A White House Diary, 1970

“But many of the iconic features of the old ballpark, such as the curved frieze atop the three-tiered grandstand, have been preserved.” — Kevin Baxter, The Los Angeles Times, 17 Aug. 2016

FRIEZE OF AMERICAN HISTORY
Source: www.aoc.gov/art/other-paintings-and-murals/frieze-american-history

Did You Know?

Today’s word is not the only frieze in English. The other frieze refers to a kind of heavy wool fabric. Both of the frieze homographs derive from French, but each entered that language through a different channel. The woolen homograph is from the Middle Dutch word vriese, which also refers to coarse wool. The frieze that we are featuring as our word today is from the Latin word frisium, meaning “embroidered cloth.” That word evolved from phrygium and Phrygia, the name of an ancient country of Asia Minor whose people excelled in metalwork, wood carving, and (unsurprisingly) embroidery. That embroidery lineage influenced the use of frieze for the middle division of an entablature, which commonly has a decorated surface resembling embroidered cloth.

Acanthus frieze 1st century A.D. Domus Aurae, Rome.
Source: orientalist-art.org

My Take

I must admit, the moment I saw the word, the geek in me went to the character Dr. Frieze from DC Comics and Batman. However, I knew that M-W wouldn’t take me in that direction. I was pleased to find out just what they meant.

I always wondered what you call those bands of sculpted or painted artwork banding a building. Now I know. Be it interior or exterior, friezes fascinate me. I was in Las Vegas two years ago, touring the Venetian and Caesars Palace to gape in wonder at the reproductions and representations of the originals. I love this stuff. I must admit. As I wandered the hallways and foyers of these hotels, I lagged behind my friends and family as I stood and stared at the works of art. Yes, in my opinion, though reproductions, they are works of art.

Yet, I can’t help wonder whether today’s comic strips could be considered friezes. Do they meet the definition of a frieze? Long painted panel scenes organized side by side. I wonder. What about you?

Please share your comments. I’m sure we would all enjoy reading them.

By the way, if you share this post by clicking one of the twitter buttons, you will be treated with a sexier image. My gift to you.

mw_logoBrought to you by Merrian-Webster, Word of the Day.

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